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Author Guidelines

Guide for Authors

General remarks

1.Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae (ASGP) is the scientific journal of the Polish Geological Society. Original contributions and review articles are considered for publication in Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae. Submissions for publication may be from all branches of the geological sciences, including applied and economic geology, as well as discussions of papers, previously published in the journal. The language of the journal is English. Manuscripts and all correspondence to the editors should be sent by e-mail to the address: asgp.editors@gmail.com.

Submission is accepted only in an electronic format. The entire paper should be submitted as a single file in .pdf format (text, followed by tables and figures). In addition, the text should be submitted separately in .doc or .rtf form. Please number the lines, both in the .pdf and text (.doc or .rtf) files, using continuous-line numbering. After acceptance, the text and tables should be supplied as .doc files and the illustrations as .tiff or .cdr files.

A cover letter should give the exact address of each author, including the phone number and e-mail address. The corresponding author should be indicated. The names of at least four reviewers from among specialists in the topic of the paper, as well as their postal and e-mail addresses, should be provided. International reviewers are preferred. Collaborators of the author(s) during the last two years should be excluded from the list of possible reviewers.

2. The author(s) declare that the paper is original, that it has not been published, either in its entirety or in part in any language before, and that it is not presently under consideration for publication elsewhere (except for possibly in the form of an abstract). The publication has been approved by all co-authors (if any), as well as by the appropriate authorities at the institution, where the work was carried out. A statement to this effect should be included in the cover letter.

The authors agree to transfer the copyright to the publisher, the Polish Geological Society. This means that the manuscript will not be published elsewhere in any language without the consent of the copyright holder; that written permission has been obtained by the authors for the use of materials from any other copyright holder; and that any costs, associated with obtaining this permission, are the responsibility of the author(s).

3. The author should bear in mind the fact that copied parts of the text (including figures), in the original or in translated form, without proper citation or permission (if necessary), are viewed as plagiarism, which is in obvious conflict with the originality requirement. The permissions should be attached to the cover letter.

4. The author(s) have 4 weeks to submit a revised version of the manuscript after receiving reviews. Any version submitted after that time will be considered to be the submission of a new manuscript, except for time-consuming revisions that were the subject of consultation with the Editor. Essentially accepted manuscripts are subject to an English proofread, and author(s) are requested to submit the revised manuscript within one week; otherwise all linguistic corrections will be automatically accepted. Proofs should be corrected within one week; otherwise the proofs will be considered as accepted.

5. The manuscript, tables and figures should be submitted in accordance with the instructions regarding manuscripts and illustrations (see below).

6. The paper should not be longer than 50 pages of double-spaced lines of text on A4 paper. Longer papers may be accepted, subject to approval by the Editor-in-Chief. Discussions and replies for publication should not be longer than 5 pages.

7. All contributions are reviewed by at least two anonymous specialists. The reviews are sent to the (corresponding) author, together (if necessary) with the editorial suggestions and with editorial remarks. In such a case, the author is expected to send back an annotated version, in which all changes are marked (the function “mark changes" in MS Word is recommended), and a corrected version, both in complete form (text, tables, illustrations) in .pdf and the text only in MS Word, as well as the copies with reviewers' notes, to the ASGP editorial office for final acceptance. Some manuscripts may be sent out for additional review, before final acceptance.

8. Proofs should be sent back to the ASGP editorial office within two weeks. Delays could result in the publication date being put back to that of the next, or even a later issue of the journal. Additions are not normally made at the proof stage. If changes are necessary, the author may be charged for any related costs.

9. Colour illustrations may be submitted for publication, at least in the online version. The printing of colour figures free of charge is possible, but it depends on the current financial situation.

10. Papers that have been accepted for publication are posted on-line and can be considered as “in press", until the paper is printed in hard copy.

11. Off-prints may be ordered and prepaid by the author, when the proofs are returned for publication.

Manuscript

12. Organisation of the manuscript:

1.     Title of the paper, which should not exceed 90 characters, including spaces (a short title, up to 40 characters long, including spaces, may be provided for the use as the running header);

2.     Name(s) of the author(s), their affiliation(s) with the address(es) of the relevant institution(s), and the e-mail address(es) of the author(s);

3.     Reference note: author(s) name(s), year of publication, title of the paper, name of the journal Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae;

4.     Abstract should be informative rather than descriptive, with an emphasis on new data and conclusions, pertinent to the subject matter, and not longer than 300 words;

5.     Key words, no more than seven. It is recommended that authors do not repeat words used in the title;

6.     Main text (introduction, geological setting of the area, methods and materials, results, discussion, conclusions);

7.     Acknowledgements (if any). Please, remember to acknowledge the reviewers;

8.     List of references;

9.     Appendices (if any);

10.   Figure captions (in style follow the latest issues of ASGP);

11.   Tables;

12.   Figures.

13. Appendices should be used for long tables and listings, such as for the specimens examined and locality information. If they are extensive, they will be published online only.

Headings

14. For clarity of presentation, the text should be appropriately divided into sections and paragraphs. Each part of the text, except for the acknowledgements, must belong to one of the first-order sections, the remaining division is arbitrary. Four ranks of headings are used in the ASGP. The rank of the heading should be alphabetically designated, that is, (A) for the first-order rank, (B) for the second-order headings, (C) for the third-order headings and (D) for the fourth-order headings.

Symbols, numbers, dimensions, and other units

15. All uncommon symbols should be clearly defined, where they first appear in the text or in a separate list.

16. Isotope numbers should precede the element symbol, for example, 18O. The valence of ions should be given as, for example, 2+ rather than ++.

17. The Système International d'Unités (SI) should be used for most units, but some non-standard measurements are acceptable, for example, in centimetres. Temperatures should be expressed in degrees Celsius.

18. The age of a stratigraphic unit or the time of a geological event may be expressed as years before the present (which by convention means 1950). The recommended abbreviations are Ma and ka for millions and thousands of years, respectively.

Abbreviations, contractions, formulae

19. Abbreviations should be followed by a full stop (ed., pl., e.g., i.e., aff., cf., etc., Dr., Mr., Jr.). This rule does not refer to contractions (eds, pls).

20. Points of the compass should be written in upper-case letters, without full stops (e.g., N, SW).

21. Most Latin words and abbreviations should be in italics, for example: in situ, non, sensu, et al., versus, s.l. and s.s. Exceptions include: cf., e.g., i.e. and etc.

22. Abbreviations of units of measurement, for example, m, km, cm, g, s, should be used only in conjunction with numerals with no full-stops, no “s” for “plural” and preceded by a space.

23. Sentences should not start with an abbreviation or a number. For example, “Figure 1...” and not “Fig. 1…” should be used at the beginning of the sentence.

24. The distinction between hyphens (as in post-Silurian), and en-dashes (as in Silurian–Devonian, 5–10 m, NE–SW) should be observed.

25. Mineral abbreviations are recommended for reactions, subscripts, superscripts and figures. The full names should be used, where they stand alone in the text. The list of abbreviations was proposed in Kretz (1983, American Mineralogist, 68: 277–279) and Whitney and Evans (2010, American Mineralogist, 95: 185– 187). However, any other consistent set may be used.

References in the text

26 The references in the text should be carefully cross-checked with the list of references, in order to ensure completeness and consistency in the spelling of names and the use of dates. A reference in the text to a publication should be made using name (with initials, only when there are two or more authors with the same family name) and year. Abbreviations et al. should be used if there are more than two authors, but never in the list of references; 'and' should be used for two authors. The abbreviations “op. cit.” and “ibid.” are not used. For instance, “According to Kowalski (1988)” or “A previous report (Brown and Francis, 1990) shows...” or “Contrary to what is commonly accepted (e.g., Ironside, 1977, 1981; Ciesielski, 1980a, b) our measurements suggest...” or “Szary and Bury (1912) first documented....” or “...as described by Lewis et al. (1991)”.

27. When directly quoting other authors, the exact page reference should be given (e.g., Bauer, 1980, p. 71). Indirect reference to the other author's opinions requires use of the form vide (Latin believe), for example “...as found by Gonzales (1972, vide Davies, 1984)”. Note that, in such a case, the paper by Gonzales (1972) also should be listed in “References”.

28. The use of personal unpublished information should be marked using the family name with initials and a date (e.g., J. Krupa, pers. comm., 1987, or J. Krupa, unpubl. data, 1987).

29. Papers not accepted for publication (in preparation, in review or in revision) should not be cited.

30. The tables and figures from cited papers should not be capitalized (e.g., Cook, 1994, fig. 3).

List of references

31. Under the heading “References”, all cited publications should be listed. All references in the text, tables, figure captions and appendices (and only those) should be included in the list. In the list, the order is alphabetical by the family names of the authors and chronological for multiple papers by the same author(s). For the papers by the same author(s) from the same year, lower-case letters are added to the date (e.g., 2000a, b).

32. Titles should be given in English for the papers in English and those, which have an English summary or abstract. In the latter case, the original language should be indicated in parentheses, e.g., “[In Polish, English summary.]”. For entirely non-English papers the original language should be used in the Latin alphabet or transliterated, if non-Latin. For the latter publications, the original spelling should be supplied separately, hand-written or typed.

33. The names of periodicals should be given in italics, unabbreviated, in their form at the date of issue (e.g., Rocznik Polskiego Towarzystwa Geologicznego for the issues before 1981, and Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae for later dates). References to low-circulation journals should specify the place of publication. The exact order and punctuation within citations, used in ASGP, should be carefully followed, according to the examples given below and to References in recent issues of this journal.

34. The following examples show specific rules of citing publications adopted in ASGP.

– for books:

Tucker, M. E. & Wright, V. P., 1990. Carbonate Sedimentology. Blackwell, Oxford, 482 pp.
Książkiewicz, M., 1979. Geologia dynamiczna. Wydawnictwa Geologiczne, Warszawa, 708 pp. [In Polish.]

– for journal articles:

Jasionowski, M., 1995. A Cretaceous non-depositional surface in Kraków Upland. Annales Societatis Geologorum Po- loniae, 65: 63–78. [In Polish, with English summary.]

Łomnicki, J., 1897. Iły krakowieckie. Kosmos (Lwów), 22: 571–578. [In Polish.]

Matyszkiewicz, J., Krajewski, M., Kochman, A., Kozłowski, A. & Duliński, M., 2016. Oxfordian neptunian dykes with brachiopods from the southern part of the Kraków-Częstochowa Upland (southern Poland) and their links to hydrothermal vents. Facies, 62, 12. [28 pp.]

Stigh, J. & Ronge, B., 1980. Origin and emplacement of two compositional layered ultramafic bodies in the Caledonides of Västerbotten, Sweden. Geologiska Föreninges i Stockholm Förhandlingar, 100 [for 1978]: 317–334.

Fischer, G., 1936. Der Bau des Glatzer Schneegebirges. Jahrbuch der Preußischen Geologischen Landesanstalt, 56: 712– 732.

– for chapters in edited books (e.g., conference volumes, special issues, etc.):

Boothroyd, J. C. & Nummedal, D., 1978. Proglacial braided river outwash: a model for humid alluvial-fan deposits. In: Miall, A. D. (ed.), Fluvial Sedimentology. Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, Memoir, 5: 641–668.

Chafetz, H. S., Wilkinson, B. H. & Love, K. M., 1985. Morphology and composition of non-marine carbonate cements in near surface settings. In: Schneidermann, N. & Harris, P. M. (eds), Carbonate Cements. Society of Economic Palaeontologists and Mineralogists, Special Publication, 36: 337–347.

Deines, P., 1980. The isotopic composition of reduced organic carbon. In: Fritz, P. & Fontes, J. C. (eds), Handbook of Environmental Isotope Geochemistry. Volume 1, The Terrestrial Environment, A. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 329–406.

Hoffmann, M. & Paszkowski, M., 1989. Skały węglanowe paleozoiku antykliny Dębnika. In: Rutkowski, J. (ed.), Prze- wodnik IX Zjazdu Polskiego Towarzystwa Geologicznego, Kraków, 14–16 września 1989. Wydawnictwo Akademii Górniczo-Hutniczej, Kraków, pp. 25–30. [In Polish.]

Jones, B., 1994. Diagenetic processes associated with plant roots and microorganisms in karst terrains of the Cayman Islands, British West Indies. In: Wolfe, K. H. & Chilngarian, G. V. (eds), Diagenesis, IV. Developments in Sedimentology, 51: 425–475.

– for maps:

Heliasz, Z., Ptak, B., Więckowski, R. & Zieliński, T. 1982. Szczegółowa mapa geologiczna Polski, 1:50 000, arkusz Janów (846). Wydawnictwa Geologiczne, Warszawa. [In Polish.]

Finckh, L., Meister, F., Fischer, G. & Bederke, E., 1942. Geologische Karte des Deutschen Reiches 1:25000, H 343. Blatt Glatz, Könishein, Reichenstein und Landeck mit Erläuterungen. Reichsamt für Bodenforschung, Berlin.

– for papers in press. (This indicates that the paper already has been accepted for publication.):

Kowalski, J., (in press). Sandstones of the Niwka Formation. Studia Geologica Polonica.

Kowalski, J., (in press). Sandstones of the Niwka Formation. Studia Geologica Polonica, doi:1234/sgp.5678.

Kowalski, J., 2017 (in press). Sandstones of the Niwka Formation. Studia Geologica Polonica. – only when the year of publication is known

– for web sites:

Smith, A. B. & Kroh, A., 2012. The Echinoid Directory. The Natural History Museum. http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research- curation/research/projects/echinoid-directory/index.html [14.01. 2012]. – The date of accessing the site is given in parentheses.

Agaty, 2012. Agaty sudeckie z kolekcji Jana Rzymełki. http://geoportal.pgi.gov.pl/portal/page/portal/muzeum/ wydarzenia/archiwum/agaty_sudeckie/ B7F7293074B4C03 CE0430A000375C03C [In Polish; 05.03.2012]. – The date of accessing the site is given in parentheses.

– for unpublished works:

Ibek, M., 1991. Morfologia i czwartorzęd Kotliny Dzierżoniowskiej. Unpublished MSc. Thesis, University of Wrocław, 58 pp. [In Polish.]

Figures

35. Figures should be numbered consecutively in Arabic numerals, and each one must be referred to in the text (as, for instance: Fig. 5A; Figs 6, 7; Figs 5–7). All parts of composite figures should have identifying Latin capital letters.

36. Each figure should either match the size of a column width (84 mm), or a page (174 mm). Maximum height is 245 mm.

37. Photographs should have a linear (bar) scale on them.

38. The smallest letters should be not less than 7 points (2 mm) in height. The minimum line width is 0.1 mm. Fine stippling should be avoided.

39. It is better to use line shading or hatching rather than tints. If tints are used then they need to be over 20% and no greater than 70%. Tints within a figure need to be distinct: we would recommend at least a 20% differential between tints.

40. Vector drawings (*.cdr format, CMYK), Tiff 600 dpi Grayscale or CMYK and RGB (photos) are accepted. Files created by digital cameras are accepted only if they are submitted in *.tiff format and are scaled to 100% at 300–600 dpi.

Tables

41. Tables should be titled and numbered with Arabic numerals

42. Large tables should be avoided. If many data are to be presented, an attempt should be made do divide these into two or more tables.

43. Tables should be typed on separate sheets, not included as part of the text.

44. Tables with graphic elements must be prepared in graphics software and submitted at publication size.

45. Each table should be saved as a separate computer file.

Stratigraphical and palaeontological matter
Stratigraphy

46. System, series, stage, biozone, group, formation, member and bed names should be capitalized, as in the Macelowa Marl Member of the Jaworki Formation. The following contractions and abbreviations may be used, provided that they are spelled in full at first mention: Gp (Group), Fm (Formation), Mbr (Member), Sst (Sandstone), Slst (Siltstone), Mdst (Mudstone), Sh (Shale), Congl (Conglomerate), and Lst (Limestone). In plural forms, lithostratigraphic units should be given without abbreviations and begin with a lower case letter (e.g., the Macelowa Marl and Osice Siltstone members).

47. For stratigraphic units that contain a taxonomic name, quote both genus and species in full at first mention, as in Rotalipora cushmani Zone. Subsequently, the generic name can usually be abbreviated to a single upper case letter, followed by a full stop or dropped altogether; for example, cushmani Zone or Planula Zone. Both forms are acceptable, but they should be used consistently.

48. As a rule, “lower” and “upper” should refer to lithostratigraphic units (e.g., lower Jarmuta Formation: an informal reference to a part of the Jarmuta succession; Upper Lgota Beds: a generally recognized rock unit) or chronostratigraphic units (e.g., lower Cenomanian strata: informal usage; Lower Cenomanian: a recognized substage).

49. “Early” and “late” should be used for all time units; hence, early Cenomanian, earliest Turonian, late Maastrichtian. However, capitalized words, pertaining to time, should be used, if they are applied precisely to formally defined divisions. Middle may refer to both rock and time units, but mid should be used in connection with stratigraphic units that are formally divisible into only two subunits.

Fossil nomenclature

50.The International Code of Botanical Nomenclature and International Code of  Zoological Nomenclature should be followed.

51. The generic name must be given in full at the first mention of a species. It may be abbreviated subsequently to the initial capital letter followed by a full stop, unless confusion with another genus is likely.

52. The authorship of generic and specific names should be given at least once (without dates), either at the first mention or preferably, if there are more than just a few, in a list of all taxa mentioned in the paper with author attributions and dates. Short lists of taxa within the text should usually be arranged alphabetically. Longer lists of taxa may be incorporated in the body of the text as a table or consigned to an appendix, following the references. They may include hierarchical classifications, if these are appropriate to the context of the paper. For new taxa (e.g., new species), the term “new species” is spelled out in fully only in the heading within the “Systematic Palaeontology” section. The abbreviation sp. nov. should be used elsewhere in the manuscript text.

53. Do not abbreviate names of authors, attributed to taxa. In the case of authors with the same surname, add their initials.

54. The following may be applied to fossil names in roman font, not in italic: gen. nov., sp. nov., cf., aff., ex gr., var. and similar notations; hence, for example, Marginotruncana cf. renzi.

Systematic palaeontology

55. A full and formal systematic treatment is required for all new taxa. Previously named taxa that are included within the “Systematic palaeontology” section of a manuscript do not necessarily require a full systematic treatment (synonymies, diagnoses, description, remarks, etc.); duplication of already published data should be avoided. In many instances, new observations or comparisons of specimens, considered in a manuscript, can be given attention within a “Remarks” section under each taxonomic heading, without the necessity of re-describing all aspects of the taxon.

56. The Systematic Palaeontology section should conform to the following general style:

family and lower taxonomic ranks must be cited. Authors may decide which taxonomic ranks above the level of family to include; include higher ranks if there is controversy regarding usage.

Include taxon author names and dates here (but the relevant publication needs to be included in “References”). This applies to all cited ranks, regardless of level.

 

Order NASSELARIA Ehrenberg, 1875

Family AMPHIPYNDACIDAE Riedel, 1967

Genus Amphipyndax Foreman, 1966

Type species Lithostrobus pseudoconulus Pessagno, 1963

Amphipyndax stocki (Campbell et Clark, 1944)

Figs 1H, 2J, K, 3A–C, 4A, H–K

 

Synonymy. The sequence of topics under the name begins with the synonymy. Synonymies need not be complete, but should cover the original designation, significant citations, in which material ascribed to the taxon has been described under a different name, or where name revisions are proposed or sustained. Use multiple authors’ names (not “et al.”).
 Fossil open nomenclature should follow general principles, preferably as set out in “Open nomenclature” by P. Bengston (1988, Paleontology, 31: 223–227).
Example:

         *1944  Stichocapsa stocki sp. nov. – Campbell et Clark, p. 44, pl. 8, figs 31–33.

    non 1968  Amphipyndax(?) stocki (Campbell et Clark) – Foreman, p. 78, pl. 8, figs 12a–c.

partim 1994  Stichomitra stocki (Campbell et Clark) – O’Dogherty, p. 147, pl. 18, figs 9–15 [non pl. 18, fig. 2].

       v 1994  Stichomitra stocki (Campbell et Clark) – Wilson, p. 23, fig. 17a.

 

Roman numerals of figures and tables should be converted to Arabic numerals unless there is possible ambiguity. Citations of plates, figures, and pages are abbreviated in the synonymy, and they have lower-case initials.

 

Subheadings should be boldfaced, with the first letter capitalized (e.g., Diagnosis. – with text, following on the same line).

 

Use the section subheadings in the order shown below:

 

For a new species:

Species name followed by “new species” (abbreviate to “sp. nov.” elsewhere in the text).

Type species: additionally required for a new genus.
Figures (required).

Synonymy list (including page, plate and figure citations, if applicable).

Holotype: (required) repository acronyms must be provided.

Etymology: (required) derivation of name.

Material: number of specimens (required). A description of the deposition of types is required, including the location of the collection, repository acronyms, and catalogue numbers.

Dimensions: (required, but can be included in the description).

Diagnosis: (required) in telegraphic style and in a standard sequence; authors should ensure that diagnoses distinguish the taxon in question from all morphologically similar taxa.

Description: (required) in telegraphic style and in a standard sequence (not necessarily the same as in the diagnosis). Reference to figures is permitted in the description and diagnosis.

Remarks: (required – similarities and differences with other taxa should be discussed).

Type locality: (required) include information on geographic location of type localities.

Type level: (required) include information on stratigraphic formation (e.g., “Upper Lgota Beds, Silesian Unit; sample RO-26/99”).

Stratigraphic distribution: (required, but can be included in remarks) include information on the geologic age.

 

For a previously described species:

Species name, followed by author and date.

Figures (required).

Synonymy list (recommended); including page, plate and figure citations.

Material: (required).

Dimensions: (optional; can be included in the description).

Diagnosis: (optional); in telegraphic style and in a standard sequence.

Description: (optional); in telegraphic style and in a standard sequence (not necessarily the same as the diagnosis). Reference to figures is permitted in the description and diagnosis.

Remarks: (recommended).

Distribution: (optional; can be included in the description), including information on the geologic age.

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The author(s) declare that the paper is original, that it has not been published, either in its entirety or in part in any language before, and that it is not presently under consideration for publication elsewhere (except for possibly in the form of an abstract). The publication has been approved by all co-authors (if any), as well as by the appropriate authorities at the institution, where the work was carried out. A statement to this effect should be included in the cover letter.
  2. The text is double-spaced; uses a 12-point font. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

  3. The submission file is in .pdf format (text, followed by tables and figures). In addition, the text should be submitted separately in .doc or .rtf form.
  4. Manuscript and all correspondence to the editors should be sent by e-mail to the address: asgp.editors@gmail.com
  5. The author(s) have 4 weeks to submit a revised version of the manuscript after receiving reviews. Any version submitted after that time will be considered to be the submission of a new manuscript, except for time-consuming revisions that were the subject of consultation with the Editor. Essentially accepted manuscripts are subject to an English proofread, and author(s) are requested to submit the revised manuscript within one week; otherwise all linguistic corrections will be automatically accepted. Proofs should be corrected within one week; otherwise the proofs will be considered as accepted.
 

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