O kształcie Półwyspu Helskiego w czasach historycznych w świetle źródeł kartograficznych

Anna Tomczak, Iwona Dmochowska

Abstrakt


SHAPE OF THE HEL PENINSULA IN HISTORIC TIMES IN LIGHT OF CARTOGRAPHIC RECORDS

Summary
An idea that in 17th and 18th centuries in the place of the Hel Peninsula a row of island existed that in time joined forming thus the peninsula, derives from the map of the Gdansk Bay from 1655. The analysis of shape of the Hel Peninsula that is shown in 77 maps and plans from 1507 -1857 indicates that 70% of them records uniform peninsula, e.g. all the oldest maps and plans (Fig. 1) and also manuscripts of maps of the Gdansk Bay (Fig. 2) by W. Clemens from 1596 (Fig. 3), F. Getkant from 1637 (Fig. 4) and P. Langau from 1659. However, in 30% of maps, mostly from the second half of the 18th century, the Hel Peninsula was shown as island(s): one, for and – most commonly - six (Fig. 1). As can be supposed from the dates of publishing and editors, those maps derived from the re-drawing of the map from 1655, and explanations have been omitted. These explanations evidence that the breaks in the peninsula continuity resulted from storm overflows. The analysis of cartographical records indicates without doubt that in historical times the Hel Peninsula was continuous and uniform, and thus a myth of insular origin of the Hel Peninsula should fall into oblivion.