Budowa geologiczna jednostki łysogórskiej (Góry Świętokrzyskie) na podstawie analizy zdjęć radarowych

Leonard Mastella, Włodzimierz Mizerski

Abstrakt


GEOLOGICAL SETTING OF THE ŁYSOGÓRY UNIT (HOLY CROSS MOUNTAINS, CENTRAL POLAND) BASED ON ANALYSIS OF THE RADAR IMAGES

Summary
The paper is focused on the geological setting of the Łysogóry Range between the region northwards of Kielce to the eastern ending of the Truskolaska Hill based on the photointerpretation of radar images in the 1:200.000 scale at a resolution of ca. 30 meters. Side selection radar images, taken in concordance with the strike of the geological structures, were chosen for interpretation. The images remove part of the obstracles due to regetation cover and weathered debris. Therefore they are very useful for the recognition of the lithostratigraphy and tectonics of the Łysogóry Unit. Four lithological complexes, corresponding to the previously distinguished lithostratigraphic units, were recognised in the Middle and Upper Cambrian strata. Generally, the Łysogóry Unit is characterised by strata dipping monoclinally northwards. Southern dips occur sporadically within the shale sandstone complex I, where they are linked with folding. The Łysogóry Unit is delimited bounded by a dislocation (Holy Cross Dislocation) not only from the south, but probably also from the north. Eastwards from Radostowa Hill and Nowa S³upia, the latter dislocation is cut by a series of NE–SW trending sinistral faults. This might indicate its strike-slip, dextral character. Similarly, a series of NW–SE trending large dextral faults, lying at 25o in relation to the dislocation, accompany the Holy Cross Dislocation. This proves that they are low-angle Riedel shears (R). In this interpretation the presence of a dextral strike-slip component along with the dip-slip component should be assumed. Additionally, in effect of these fault the Łysogóry Unit was flaked, and the individual flakes were husted upon each other. Among the many large regional faults cutting the Łysogóry Unit, the only distinct fault is the Łysogóry Dislocation westwards of Nowa Słupia. The others are invisible in radar images. This is probably caused by the limitations of this method. In effect, the remote sensing method should be supplemented by fieldwork.

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